Auto Focus | Head to Head: Toyota Rush Vs Honda Br-V

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Auto Focus | Head to Head: Toyota Rush Vs Honda Br-V

Video Channel: Auto Focus

In today’s Head-to-Head, it’s a battle between two notable seven-seaters in the local auto industry. One has been around longer than the other one, but both of them have proven their capabilities as their respective companies’ entry-level SUVs. I’m talking about the Honda BR-V and the Toyota Rush. Watch this.
Under the hood of the G Grade is a 1.5-liter Dual-VVTi gasoline engine that gives out 102 horsepower and 134 Newton meters of torque. These generous numbers go along a 4-speed automatic transmission. Meanwhile, the BR-V is also powered by a 1.5-liter i-VTEC engine, although it produces higher power and torque at 120 ps of power and 145 Nm of torque. Power is transferred to front wheels and shifts via a Continuously Variable Transmission or CVT. To make the most out of its power, the CVT also comes with a seven-speed manual mode.
The suspension setup of the G Grade uses MacPherson Strut at the front and Coil Spring at the rear. This layout makes the car capable of carrying all the weight especially at the back. For the BR-V, its suspension setup also uses MacPherson Strut while the rear uses a torsion beam. Just like with the G Grade, the BR-V’s suspension was designed to accommodate all the weight, as well as to meet the demands of harsh road conditions.
It’s time to check out what these cars have to offer when it comes to their exterior and interior designs.
Basing on its outside look, the Rush resembles a lot of other cars in Toyota’s lineup, although it still has its distinguished features. The front fascia comes with LED headlights with integrated LED daytime running lights that blend with the grill. This very detail is what makes the Rush look sharp despite its similarity with Toyota’s other SUVs. Another noticeable detail is that the spare tie is no longer attached to the back door like how it was with the previous Rush. Instead, it’s now placed at the undercarriage.
On the other hand, the BR-V also seems to adopt some details from another Honda car, but it’s also able to stand on its own. At the front, we see slim, wraparound headlights and the maker’s signature “Solid Wing Face” fascia. A pair of roof rails also boosts the SUV's practicality. At the rear, it has C-shaped tail lights that are connected by a reflective strip. It gives the BR-V a tougher appearance, albeit in a smaller package.
Hopping inside the Rush, you’ll notice right away that it gives out that modern and high-end vibes even though the materials used are mostly plastic. The interior’s most prominent color is black, which comes with silver accents and some cream-colored trim. Meanwhile, the cabin also doesn’t look much different from Toyota’s other SUVs.
Moreover, the dashboard is highlighted by a 7-inch touchscreen that can connect to any smartphone via Bluetooth or a USB port. The audio control in the Rush, which is optimized by 8 speakers, is attached on the steering wheel so the driver could easily operate it with just one tap. Additionally, to make it easier for the driver to navigate the car, the Rush offers tilt steering feature to move up the steering wheel position. Moreover, the smart start and stop button, air conditioning double blower and parking cameras are to the head unit.
Since the G Grade is a seven-seater, 3 passengers can fit in the middle row and another 2 passengers can sit comfortably in the 3rd row. The middle row folds and tumbles and has a 60:40 split, and the third row also has a fold and tumble with a 50:50 split.
For the BR-V, it’s still the same with the Rush in a way that there are certain parts where one can say they’ve seen it before in other Honda models. The BR-V comes with automatic climate control, a touchscreen and second-row air-conditioning.
On to its third row, it is stowed through a flip-forward mechanism that requires you to hook it to the rear headrests. To set up the seats, unhook the seat downwards and adjust each backrest to the preferred position. Since the BR-V is also a seven-seater, it has a generous amount of space. More than enough for seven people, surprisingly.
The infotainment system of the BR-V is equipped with Garmin-powered 7-inch touchscreen with Navigation with Bluetooth and USB connectivity as well. Entertainment is courtesy of 4 speakers.
When it comes to safety and security, the Rush is equipped with Toyota’s standard features, such as the Anti-Lock Braking System with Emergency Brake Signal, Solid Vehicle Stability Control, and 6 SRS airbags.
The BR-V also comes with standard safety and security features. It include smart entry with push start system, automatic air conditioning, rear air conditioning with independent controls, Vehicle Stability Assist, Hill Start Assist, and dual airbags.
Deciding what you prefer more between the Honda BR-V and the Toyota Rush could be naturally difficult, given that both SUVs stand out. We hope that this week’s Head-to-Head was able to help you with that.

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